Search This Blog

Thursday, 29 June 2017

NBTM, REVIEW & #GIVEAWAY - Spooning Daisy by Maggie McConnell

GENRE:   

Contemporary Romance (romantic comedy)

~~~~~~~~~~~~~

BLURB:

Her mango chutney is exquisite; her blueberry sauce to die for. But Chef de Cuisine Daisy Moon is a woman without a kitchen after a "bit of trouble" at her last job. Now blacklisted from Seattle to San Francisco, Daisy's sole job offer is from Wild Man Lodge in Otter Bite, Alaska, where the end of the road is just her beginning.


Add to Goodreads  |  BookLikes



"I had apple strudel. I never have apple strudel. It's not my usual."

"You came here to tell me you had apple strudel?"

"The thing is...I liked it. For a change, I mean. Once. Not every day, of course."

"Max--"

"The truth is..." He stepped toward her. "The truth is...I feel bad about giving you such a hard time at breakfast."

"Ohhhh. This is an apology."

"No, absolutely not." Max retracted the step he'd just taken. "This is absolutely NOT an apology."

Daisy huffed. Normally, she'd take great satisfaction in Max's guilt and take equal pleasure in the banter that would surely follow. However, she was a woman on a mission, and she didn't have the time, not with Otter Bite hanging by a manila envelope. "Fine. Thank you for coming here NOT to apologize and for that apple strudel thing. And--" She momentarily softened. "--the money. But I just don't have the time for whatever this is."

Once again he stepped toward her. "You're making this extremely difficult."

"This? This what? What am I making--"

"This." The word melted into her mouth.

The two hundreds floated from her hand to the floor. Then, her arms wrapped Max's neck, his body pressed hers, and Daisy was lost in a kiss she never expected to own.

Universal Link



5 out of 5 (exceptional)


Independent Reviewer for Archaeolibrarian - I Dig Good Books!


This was such a sweet little surprise of a read. Humor, romance, wit and charm, who could ask for more.

The story line was great. It was full of surprises, hilarity, and some serious frustration. Max was the most frustrating of a character but also one that you couldn’t forget if you tried. His character kept me reading. I had how his character grew and blossomed, if he even did. He is a character you’ll love to hate, for sure.

Details and descriptions were spot on. The descriptions of the scenery definitely made me want to visit Alaska and see the scenery and the sights. I enjoy cold weather so this was just a little extra push to make me want to visit. The details made it incredibly easy to keep reading, to understand what was happening and the surroundings. These items made the story flow from page to page flawlessly.

I certainly enjoyed this story. It was an easy read, provided an entering and fun read, and allowed me to escape reality for a few hours.

* A copy of this book was provided to me with no requirements for a review. I voluntarily read this book, and the comments here are my honest opinion. *

What’s in a Cover?


     What’s in a cover? That, which we call a romance, with any other cover, would still read as sweet.  Right?
     In theory. And my apologies to Will Shakespeare for mangling Juliet’s heartfelt plea to Romeo. Not that he was ever going to change his name from Montague to Smyth. Nonetheless, the question remains—what’s in a cover?
     Everything. Unless you’re Nora, Tessa, or (insert the name of your favorite best-selling author here). Then you don’t need a cover, let alone a good one. Probably could do without a title. Just “a book by” and you’re good to go. But for unknown authors like me, everything.
     It’s the first impression. And you never get a second chance to make a good first impression. Yet, depending on the cover, it might be a bad first impression. Then what?
     Don’t judge a book by its cover? Although my mom used that metaphor when a geeky senior boy asked sophomore me to a high school dance, I’m positive it originated from an author unhappy with her cover. I mean, if we’re not supposed to judge a book by its cover illustration, why have one? Nonetheless, it gives me hope. Maybe readers will buy my “smart, sexy, zinger of a romance” (in the words of one reviewer) despite a double whammy of a cover—bland and poorly rendered. I look at the illustration and see “simple, sweet, blahhh.”  My book and my cover are at cross-purposes.
     With so many books vying for attention, and so little time, can readers be expected to ignore covers and judge a book instead by the blurb and a few beginning pages? Perhaps all books should have brown paper covers like the book jackets I used to make out of grocery bags for my high school textbooks. (Some of you will remember these; others will be going “huh?”)  Then “judging a book by its cover” will become as obsolete as VHS tapes.
     In the early 1900’s publishers began in earnest using illustrated covers to convey information about books. I’m almost certain publishers got the idea from canned goods whose labels had illustrations of whatever was inside. Thing is, you don’t put a picture of a pickle on a can of peaches. Or you end up with unhappy customers, thinking they’re buying one thing and getting another. The packaging is there to tell the consumer what’s inside. And so it is—or should be—with a book cover.
     Authors who don’t like their covers aren’t exactly rare. But there are legitimate complaints.     When I presented the cover of Spooning Daisy to my friends…silence. After I admitted that I didn’t like the depiction either, the relief was palpable; we had a cathartic rant of all its misses. Finally, someone said (wishing to make me feel better, I’m sure), “It’s really not that bad.” The problem is, “not that bad” isn’t the look I’m going for in either a new hairstyle or a book cover.
     Many years ago, before the internet provided millions of books at the click of a button, I would visit my local bookstore, choose a book and read the opening pages, until I found a story I couldn’t put down. When I hold a book in my hands, it’s easier to ignore covers, although my initial interest still begins with the cover. Today, with bricks and mortar crumbling around us, and the internet our primary shopping source, if the cover art doesn’t hook the reader you want—instead of chasing her away—the book is as doomed as Romeo & Juliet. 


Follow the tour and comment; the more you comment, the better your chances of winning. The tour dates can be found HERE




Maggie McConnell will be offering

 

1) Nordstrom "Daisy" vegan leather clutch, 

2) Nordstrom turtle pin, or 

3) Rebecca Minkoff star pendant/necklace 


to 3 randomly drawn winners (US only; international winners will receive a $25 Amazon/BN GC).



a Rafflecopter giveaway


Golden Heart nominee Maggie McConnell spent her childhood overseas as the daughter of US diplomats. Attending college in Illinois, she earned a BA in Art and an MBA while working at the local humane shelter. At 26, she packed her dog and cat into a Ford truck and drove the Alcan Highway to Alaska, where she spent 23 years exploring The Last Frontier in a single-engine Cessna. A vegan and animal rights advocate, Maggie provides a sanctuary on her Arizona ranch for all creatures great and small, but her immediate family includes dog Molly, cat Sara, horses Quinn and Teena, and an ever-growing dynasty of chipmunks. Every year, like the Gray Whale, Maggie returns to Alaska.

Website: 

Facebook Author Page:

Tour Organised by: Goddess Fish Promotions